U.S. Navy Holds Open House for Miramar Pipeline Project

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8" cutout of the carbon steel used for the Miramar Pipeline

Last evening 3/18/19 the U.S. Navy held an open house at Lafayette Elementary in Clairemont to explain and answer any questions residents may have about 2 potential realignments of the U.S. Navy Miramar Pipeline.

If you were unable to attend the open house there is still time to submit comments either via mail or email.  All comments must be received or postmarked by April 1, 2019 to be considered. (See below how to submit comments)

The Miramar Pipeline is a 17 mile stretch of 8” carbon steel pipe from Naval Base Point Loma to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar and was built in 1954 to provide fuel for ships and aircraft.

The purpose of the open house was to explain two sections of pipe in two different neighborhoods in which the Navy would like to relocate under the City of San Diego streets from their current location.

High Tech High

High Tech High Miramar Pipeline Encroachment

The plan is to cap the pipeline in the area where it turns East under HTH property.  Currently the pipeline is placed under HTH and exits to Mount Alifan Drive just before the Genesee intersection.  The plan would be to cap the pipe at both ends near HTH points.  Prior to closing both ends of the pipe it would be emptied, cleaned and filled with a concrete slurry and abandoned underground.

The new pipeline would now continue along Mount Alifan taking a right turn under Mount Acadia and rejoining the existing pipeline.

Cannington Drive

Currently the pipeline travels along Mount Abernathy heading Northeast before crossing the 805.  As you can see in the map it travels under homes as well as the Church of Latter-Day Saints and continues under Lana Drive as well as more private property.

Same process as the HTH area the pipe would be capped at two ends and rerouted this time turning on Printwood Way past Lafayette Elementary and head North on Cannington Drive.  Again, the existing section would be abandoned in place.

Why is this being proposed?

As the visuals show the existing pipeline travels under a school (HTH) and under private residences as well as a church property.  These proposed proactive projects would relocate a total of roughly 3,400’ feet of pipe under the City of San Diego streets.

8″ cutout of the carbon steel used for the Miramar Pipeline

Timelines

The entire project is scheduled to take 6 months for both relocation areas.  At this time, it was not determined whether both projects would start simultaneously or one at a time.  The impacts would of course cause some traffic delays whether it meant lane narrowing with flag wavers or full detours and closures of roads.  The proposed construction would begin in late 2021 or 2022.

Alternatives

It is important to note these projects are not 100% a go.  See below.

How to Submit Your Comments

Currently, the U.S. Navy is conducting an Environmental Assessment for these two projects.  The open house held last night was to engage the community to present the projects and ask for public comment on the scope of work presented.

If you would like to provide input you are of course encouraged to look at the website listed below.  If you would like to email a comment it must be sent prior to April 1, 2019.

Emails can be sent to:  NAVFAC_SW_MiramarPipeline@navy.mil

If you would like to drop a comment old school via US Mail it must be postmarked by April 1, 2019 or before.  Mail comments to:

Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest

Attention: Code EV26.GW

937 N. Harbor Drive

Building 1, 3rd Floor (Environmental)

San Diego, CA 92132

When the draft Environmental Assessment (EA) is available for public review (expected Summer 2019) another open house type meeting will be held for review and public comment.  Meaning, if you submit a comment it will be recognized and addressed in the EA.

For more information, visit:

www.cnic.navy.mil/NBPLMiramarPipeline

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