City of San Diego Encourages Sustainability at Home through Urban Farming

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    sandiego.gov

    New website offers information & assistance for raising livestock & bees, and creating vegetable gardens 

    (pr) The City of San Diego has debuted a new website that provides information and assistance to become a successful urban farmer. As more people are spending time at home due to COVID-19 public health orders, urban farming has seen an uptick in popularity and the City is making resources available to support San Diegans in this effort.

    Urban farming can come in many forms and sizes. It can be a community garden that covers one or more city blocks, or it can be vegetables grown in containers on a home patio. It can include raising chickens and goats or maintaining beehives.

     The City’s new Urban Farming website includes:

    • Resources for both home and community gardens.
    • Information on raising bees, chickens and goats.
    • Access to additional data from various local and national sources.
    • Details about City programs for assistance with permits, composting, seed libraries and more.

     “Just because we live in a big city doesn’t mean we cannot become small-scale farmers,” said Erik Caldwell, the City’s Deputy Chief Operating Officer for Smart & Sustainable Communities. “The Urban Farming website is a one-stop shop with a lot of great information to help San Diegans produce their own food.”

     Urban farming supports the City’s Climate Action Plan in that producing food locally can help San Diego become more sustainable. In addition, urban farming can help residents lower their grocery bills, provide more healthy produce for their families and neighbors and improve the environment.

     For more information, visit the City’s Urban Farming website at sandiego.gov/urban-farming.

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